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BPD warns of Boston Marathon sympathy scammers

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The Bridgeport Police Department issued a news release Wednesday warning of potential online scams latching onto the sympathy and concern aroused by the bombings at the Boston Marathon on Monday.

Police warn that some online domain names registered in the wake of Monday’s bombings could be intended to “take advantage of those interested in learning more details about the explosions.”

“Others will likely target individuals looking to contribute to fundraising efforts,” the release read.

 

Bridgeport Police Chief Joseph L. Gaudett Jr. likened the effort to that of online scammers who cropped up after the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School on Dec. 14.

“I saw firsthand the generosity of our region and of our country after Sandy Hook,” Gaudett said in the statement. “It is impossible to know how many of these new domains were created with bad intent but we ask people, after this terrible incident, to act both with their hearts and their heads.”

The full text of the release, from police spokesman William Kaempffer, follows:

Boston Marathon Bombing Is Being Used to Disseminate Malware and Conduct Financial Fraud

Individuals wasted no time in registering online domain names related to Monday’s fatal explosions at the Boston Marathon.

Some of the domains are likely to take advantage of those interested in learning more details about the explosions. Others will likely target individuals looking to contribute to fundraising efforts.

It is unclear what each registrant’s intent may be, but historically, scammers, spammers and other malicious actors capitalize on major news events by registering such domains.

“I saw firsthand the generosity of our region and of our country after Sandy Hook,” said Bridgeport Police Chief Joseph L. Gaudett Jr. “It is impossible to know how many of these new domains were created with bad intent but we ask people, after this terrible incident, to act both with their hearts and their heads.”

Mayor Bill Finch described people who try to fraudulently profit from tragedy as “despicable.”
“I am always in awe at how people come together after tragedy,” said Mayor Finch. “But I am dismayed by the people who would seek to take advantage.”

 

The Risk: The bombing of the Boston Marathon, 15 April 2013, does not just mean an increased threat level across the country and globe, but includes new and recycled Internet scams. Major events tend to attract malicious individuals who use the event for their gain.

The Threats: Internet watch groups and cyber security experts have already identified multiple fake domains/websites, and charity efforts taking advantage of the Boston Marathon bombing. Based on previous tragedies, more scams will follow in the coming days. Internet users need to apply a critical eye and conduct due diligence before clicking links, visiting websites, or making donations.

Actors with unknown intentions registered over 125 domain names associated with the Boston Marathon bombings and victims, in the hours after the incident. The majority of these new domains use a combination of the words “Boston,” “Marathon,” “2013,” “bomb,” “explosions,” “attack,” “victims,” and “donate” and should be viewed with caution. More domains are likely to follow.

Malicious actors are using social networking websites to spread hoaxes, including information regarding the purported death of several child runners (children are not allowed to participate in the Boston Marathon), and injured runners purportedly running for a variety of charities and causes.

Phishing emails may provide links to malicious websites purporting to contain information, pictures, and video, or may contain attachments with embedded malware. Clicking on the links or opening the attachments can infect the victim’s computer to further malicious activity.

Multiple fake charities were created on social networking websites within minutes of the explosions purporting to collect funds for victims. Traditionally, these websites are scams.

 

The Action: Users should adhere to the following guidelines when reacting to large news events, including news associated with the Boston Marathon bombing, and solicitations for donations:

• Be cautious of emails/websites that claim to provide information because they may contain viruses.

• Do not open unsolicited (spam) emails, or click on the links/attachments contained in those messages.

• Never reveal personal or financial information in email.

• Do not go to untrusted or unfamiliar websites to view the event or information regarding it.

• Never send sensitive information over the Internet before checking a website’s security and confirming its legitimacy. Malicious websites may look identical to a legitimate site, but the URL may use a variation in spelling or a different domain (e.g., .com vs. .net)

 

 

For more information regarding potential cyber threats please visit the Center for Internet Security website at CISecurity.org.

Categories: General
Dennis O'Malley

One Response

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