Connecticut Postings

Connecticut Post newsroom blog

Man dies after high CO levels found in Milford home

|

By Frank Juliano and Jim Shay

A Milford man is dead after high levels of carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide were found in his home, officials said.

The deceased man has been identified as Ralph Mastrianna, 55.

Mastrianna’s son told fire officials his father had been working on his motorcycle in a garage to get it ready for the weekend.

According to Milford Fire Department Capt. Greg Carman, on Tuesday at 7:06 PM the department responded to 144 Juniper Drive for a possible carbon monoxide (CO) problem.

This house at 144 Juniper Drive i n Milford, is where high levels of carbon monoxide were detected Tuesday night. An unidentified man living in the house later died at Milford Hospital.

This house at 144 Juniper Drive i n Milford, is where high levels of carbon monoxide were detected Tuesday night. An unidentified man living in the house later died at Milford Hospital.

This notification came by way of the Milford Hospital Emergency Room, after the man was brought in for cardiac arrest from this address, approximately an hour before and tested high in CO levels, Carman said.

“Firefighters entered the home with air packs to use gas meters and detected elevated levels of CO and hydrogen cyanide in both the basement and the garage, where the patient was originally found,” Carman said.

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas, which can cause sudden illness and death. It is produced any time a fossil fuel is burned, according to the CDC.

The CDC says exposure to hydrogen cyanide can be rapidly fatal.

The exact cause of the gas emissions is undetermined and the investigation is still continuing.

The Milford Police Department is investigating due to this being an untimely death. Two cruisers were parked in front of the house Wednesday morning.

According to Milford tax records, the house is owned by Ralph and Concetta Mastrianna. The house, built in 2001, has 3,250 square feet of living space.

The house’s appraised value is $483,130. The house is located in the Milford Hunt neighborhood, behind the Lexington Green subdivision.

The Milford Fire Department stressed the importance of having both working smoke and carbon monoxide detectors on all levels of your home.

People should check them once a month and change the batteries twice a year. Any detector that is over ten years old should be replaced with a new one.

Check back for updates on the developing story.

 

 

Categories: General
Jim Shay

One Response

  1. lisa says:

    There are NO batteries in c/o detectors, i work for Security Solutions and we do recommend get them cleaned and changed with in the 10 years. if you do have an alarm company please schedule the yearly inspection of ur system to check and clean those smokes and c/o’s!