Connecticut High School Football

High School Football news, analysis, commentary and features from the reporters of the Hearst Connecticut Media Group.

Ansonia’s Sean Byrne named next coach at Ellington/Somers; Plus more Pequot stuff

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The Ellington/Somers co-op football team didn’t look far to find its next head coach.

Valley folk should know him pretty well, too.

Ansonia alum and former assistant Sean Byrne took over the Pequot program today after spending the last seven years as an assistant under retired coach Keith Tautkus.

The 1995 Ansonia graduate played at Western Connecticut State and then was an offensive line coach under Jack Hunt from 2001 to 2005. The Chargers won two state titles during his tenure there.

Byrne then headed to Ellington, where he developed the team’s weight room program and served in a variety of assistant coaching roles, but was mainly the team’s offensive coordinator.

The Knights have won 19 games and reached the CIAC state playoffs twice over the last two seasons.

Update: The Courant delved into the subject more on Friday.

Vinal Tech/East Hampton bolts Pequot

Also, Ellington/Somers posted the composite 2013 schedule for the Pequot League. In it, you can see the league has also gone the three-division route for this year. That, in turn, led to this find: East Hampton/Vinal Tech is no longer a part of the league.

Citing a desire to be more competitive (you don’t say…), the football co-op is moving over to the Constitution State Conference alongside Platt Tech, Bullard-Havens and Abbott Tech. Vinal Tech will also pick up the banner of the Co-op, so it’ll now be known as Vinal Tech/East Hampton.

The Middletown Press picked up on the nugget Friday.

Said athletic East Hampton athletic director Shaun Russell:

“Both schools felt we needed a football situation that would present a more competitive and realistic opportunity for on-field game success. We needed a change that would provide both an immediate boost and a long-term path that would meet the individual needs of the two partner schools as well as the combined needs of the football program.”

As for the Pequot’s new structure, the league, which stretches all across Connecticut, has now divvied itself into closer, geographical ties. The Northern schools are grouped together, the Northwest (read: Berkshire League and outliers) are grouped together, and the Shoreline League schools are grouped together. Crossover games appear to be determined by previous records (1 vs 1, 2 vs 2, etc…), making it more likely for games between the northern and southern schools.

The previous two-division configuration left little room for scheduling crossover games, leaving the Pequot to almost function as two separate leagues.

Take a gander.

SPEAKING OF WHICH: As some on here have mentioned, there seems to be some grassroots discussion about the Shoreline Schools (the south division on your graphic), breaking away from the Pequot in the near future.

Jimmy Zanor of Shoreline Sports Tweeted Thursday night that “some” Pequot teams were in talks to join the SCC by 2015.

SCC Commissioner Al Carbone said there were no discussions about such an arrangement, but he didn’t rule it out. The SCC would absolutely love at least one more team to fill out its unbalanced, 19-team football configuration. North Branford is already competing in the league for hockey…

Zanor, who covers the Shoreline, has yet to elaborate on his report. But somebody’s talking down on ye ole Shoreline. And since some of our commentators have discussed it, we have to think there’s something afoot.

Where there’s smoke, there’s a burning league.

Sean Patrick Bowley

One Response

  1. Stamford10 says:

    Yeah if you know anything about Stamford most of kids who become great players with guidance & focus do well because of the nessasary attention and nourishment to their game from this next coach. Many come from rough situations and team sports are the best way for these kids to grow into young men. Discipline and determination are necessary survival skills and high school football is an excellent source for growth, confidence, team building and leadership. This is important for our community. Coach Greene was supportive to my sons’ teams and to the individual players. Greene coached two of my sons in two different sports during formative years of their lives and they have both been impacted positively when they take on new challenges.

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