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Latest Health Research

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Men who take statins are less likely to die from prostate cancer

Men with prostate cancer who take cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins are significantly less likely to die from their cancer than men who don’t take such medication, according to a study published online in The Prostate. The risk of death from prostate cancer among statin users was 1 percent as compared to 5 percent for nonusers.

Troubling levels of toxic metals found in lipstick

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public Health tested 32 different lipsticks and lip glosses commonly found in drugstores and department stores. They detected lead, cadmium, chromium, aluminum and five other metals, some of which were found at levels that could raise potential health concerns. Their findings were published online Thursday, May 2, in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Grapes reduce heart failure associated with hypertension

A study appearing in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry demonstrates that grapes are able to reduce heart failure associated with chronic high blood pressure (hypertension) by increasing the activity of several genes responsible for antioxidant defense in the heart tissue. Grapes are a known natural source of antioxidants and other polyphenols, which researchers believe to be responsible for the beneficial effects observed with grape consumption.


Want to slow mental decay? Play a video game

Elderly people who played just ten hours of a game priming their mental processing speed and skills delayed declines by as many as seven years in a range of cognitive skills. The groups that played the game at least 10 hours, either at home or in a lab at the university, gained at least three years of cognitive improvement when tested after one year, according to a formula developed by the researchers. A group that got four additional hours of training with the game did even better, improving their cognitive abilities by four years, according to the study.

The study comes amidst a burst of research examining why, as we age, our minds gradually lose “executive function,” generally considered mission control for critical mental activities, such as memory, attention, perception and problem solving. Studies show loss of executive function occurs as people reach middle age; other studies say our cognitive decline begins as soon as 28 years of age.

Eating omega 3s and avoiding meat, dairy linked to preserving memory

The largest study to date finds that eating foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish, chicken and salad dressing and avoiding saturated fats, meat and dairy foods may be linked to preserving memory and thinking abilities. The research is published in the April 30, 2013, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study found that in healthy people, those who more closely followed the Mediterranean diet were 19 percent less likely to develop problems with their thinking and memory skills.

New findings on tree nuts and health

Three new studies involving tree nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts) were presented at the Experimental Biology Meeting in Boston, MA. Tree nut consumption was associated with a better nutrient profile and diet quality; lower body weight and lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome; and a decrease in several cardiovascular risk factors compared to those seen among non-consumers.


High Heart Rate At Rest Signals Higher Risk Of Death Even In Fit Healthy People

A high heart rate (pulse) at rest is linked to a higher risk of death even in physically fit, healthy people, suggests research published online in the journal Heart. A resting heart rate – the number of heart beats per minute – is determined by an individual’s level of physical fitness, circulating hormones, and the autonomic nervous system. A rate at rest of between 60 and 100 beats per minute is considered normal.


Low vitamin D levels a risk factor for pneumonia

Coffee may help prevent breast cancer returning

Regular use of low-dose aspirin may prevent the progression of breast cancer

More evidence berries have health-promoting properties

Drinking Cup of Beetroot Juice Daily May Help Lower Blood Pressure


Cholesterol Increases Risk of Alzheimer’s and Heart Disease

Categories: General

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