Newtown School Shooting

Updates on the Sandy Hook Elementary School Shooting

Newtown officials sought to tighten gun law

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Federal agents have visited local gun ranges after learning that Sandy Hook Elementary School shooter Adam Lanza and his mother, Nancy, may have practiced shooting together.

Lanza used a rifle to kill 26 people, including 20 children on Friday. Nancy’s mother had collected guns, according to reports, and police found four guns at the scene.

The shooting has led to calls for tighter gun laws. Connecticut already has some of the most stringent restrictions in the country.

In a New York Times report Sunday night, Newtown police commissioner and local attorney Joel Faxon said “something needs to be done,” about the types of guns being used at ranges in the town.

But, the as the Times reports, efforts by police and other officials to strengthen gun laws in Newtown were met by resistance from gun owners.

The Danbury News-Times reported on the proposed ordinance earlier this year.

In August, Newtown police and other officials tried to pass restrictions that would have given police more authority to enforce restrictions on target shooting.

Police Chief Michael Kehoe said the impetus for the proposal comes from an “inordinate amount of calls” in the past year about shooting on private residential properties.

“It seemed like it was every weekend for a while, and in the fall it seemed to intensify,” Kehoe said.

The complaining residents were not only seeking relief from noise disturbance, they feared dangerous conditions near their homes, the chief said.

The law would require the police chief to approve any outdoor target shooting ranges, restrict target shooting to the hours between 9 a.m. and dusk and limit the types of weapons allowed to be fired.

About 60 people came to a public hearing on the ordinance to voice their disapproval.

Legislative Council Member Mary Ann Jacob said in the August article that most attendees feared the town trampling on their Second Amendment rights. “And that is something we have to look at very carefully,” she said at the time.

Jacob is a librarian’s aide at Sandy Hook school. She is credited with protecting students in the school’s library by putting it on lockdown when the shooting started Friday.

In August, said the proposal will be properly vetted, including investigating the types of gun-firing complaints the police department has received and how other towns handle the issue.

A vote on the ordinance was delayed in September.

Some in Newtown still don’t want to see the gun laws changed.

Scott Ostrovsky, who has a gun range on his private property where he and friends shoot automatic weapons, squeezed between two other outdoor ranges and in an area where many of the complaints come from, told the New York Times that he doesn’t want guns to be a “scapegoat,” despite the fact he is distraught over the shooting.

“Guns are why we’re free in this country, and people lose sight of that when tragedies like this happen,” he told the Times. “A gun didn’t kill all those children, a disturbed man killed all those children.”

Categories: General
Tom Cleary

13 Responses

  1. SWC fanatic says:

    We have the most guns in the world and the most violent video games and movies. We have weak social services compared to the rest of the developed world. We also have the most shootings in the world.
    If you still can’t see the correlation between these facts, I know of 26 good reasons for strict gun control in this country

  2. Amber says:

    I think you people need to understnad why they wanna change the laws! I think it would be good even tho this girl likes to shoot stuff to. But after what happened i havent even touched a gun. Its said i have had friends die from cars but people dont change the law about them really.. Yes they changed the age and how long you have to have thingd but still. These kids were soooo young! I think if it was my neices i would kill whoever did it even tho he did shot himself. All i gotta say is good for him he deseveds EVERYTHING he gets nuff said im done here soo byyyee <3

  3. Amber says:

    I think you people need to understnad why they wanna change the laws! I think it would be good even tho this girl likes to shoot stuff to. But after what happened i havent even touched a gun. Its said i have had friends die from cars but people dont change the law about them really.. Yes they changed the age and how long you have to have thingd but still. These kids were soooo young! I think if it was my neices i would kill whoever did it even tho he did shot himself. All i gotta say is good for him he deseveds EVERYTHING

  4. sharon says:

    @Ed i live in a country that without this right, and I’m glad I have one less fear in the safety of my loved ones. My deepest regards goes out to the parents of these beautiful children. I cannot imagine living in the country where I do not know the minds of pple who possess guns of such.

    Some argue that it’s about having more mental support for pple.. yet there is no way the organizationals can completely eliminate such risks… why have it in the first place?

  5. Matt says:

    Ed, I’d encourage you to carefully read my post. Never once did I suggest taking away or giving away anyone’s rights. It would assume that people have a right to automatic and semi-automatic weapons with ammunition capable of killing large numbers of people in a short amount of time. While I stated I believe in the right to bear arms, I clearly pointed out that I do not believe anyone has the right to the aforementioned. Further, nowhere is there any explicit right to own them. It is an expansion and very liberal interpretation of the 2nd Amendment which has no basis in the historical context in which it was written.

    Your foolish, even silly, reference to using a “Quill and Ink Well,” in addition to your attempt to draw a parallel to a knife attack and concurrent banning of cutlery discredits your argument… if there even is one.

  6. Ed says:

    @Matt…I wonder, by your logic then you should still be using a Quill and Ink Well and mailing in your opinions.

    The same day in china a deranged man slashed 22 kids, yes they survived but that just means he wasn’t very good at his craft. So I guess we should go the English route and ban common everyday cutlery from those under 18yrs?

    Be careful what rights you all seem so comfortable giving away.

  7. HA says:

    I hate that comment ‘guns don’t kill people , people kill people’. I am tired of hearing this again and again. After such an incident how can people talk like this. I am surprised by their insensitivity. If this incident does not move us towards amending gun laws then nothing can.

  8. Matt says:

    Mr. Ostrovsky is sadly, and frighteningly, misguided – as are many who share his overly-broad interpretation of the 2nd Amendment to our nation’s Constitution. There is something called “Legislative Intent” that is a crucial key to understanding what our laws mean. Legislative Intent is the discussed or surmised purpose of the law in the eyes of the lawmakers at the time it is crafted.

    In the 1700′s, our forefathers included the 2nd Amendment – the right for free citizens to bear arms. The background of that Amendment was the Revolutionary War, and oppression from the King of England, from whom we sought our freedom. The timing of the amendment was such that rifles and pistols were manually loaded, usually requiring gun powder and smelted ammunition. These are both important points.

    To suggest that this law was written in order to guarantee Mr. Ostrovsky or anyone else the right to own automatic or semi-automatic weaponry to use at their own personal discretion is ludicrous. It simply is not based in fact.

    I am the owner of a gun, and it does not fit either of the two preceding categories. I do have a right to own it, and keep it locked in a secure location, as any responsible individual would do. (And by responsible, I do NOT mean shooting it off in my suburban backyard for target practice…. outrageous.)

    However, I do not believe I or anyone else has the “right” under the US Constitution to own and use the weapons utilized in this (and many others) horrific massacre.

  9. Tom says:

    There were 33,000 suicides in our country last year. Over 10,000 people were killed by drunk drivers. Does the American public question it’s mental health policies or do we keep allowing companies like Eli Lilly, Pfizer and Merck to promote drugs that may cause tragic side effects? I wonder how many MADD members will spend the upcoming year trying to introduce legislation to ban the serving of alcohol outside of the home? Thousands of innocent people are killed by drunk drivers every year, many of them children. Why aren’t the wine drinkers outraged by this? How many parents that deplore violence will let their children sit in front of their Xbox tonight and play “Call of Duty”? You’re a bunch of hypocrites.

  10. fuzzyturle says:

    “If you’re good old boys like we are, they are exciting” (from the original link). Scott Ostrovsky is a sad, sad man.

  11. Josh says:

    As a gun owner who grew up around guns, it is insane for anyone to not find a problem with how easy it is to purchase assault rifles. I’m all for protecting myself and family, but I can do that with out a weapon capable of this level of destruction.

  12. Tom says:

    A disturbed man could have not broken into the school as he did and murder 26 innocent people without his gun. The two are linked and do not pretend they’re not Mr. Ostovsky

  13. Brian says:

    Dear Mr. Ostrovsky. This disturbed man was firing a weapom capable of killing many people in a very short amount of time. I’d like to see it much more difficult for ANYONE outside of law enforcement or the military to obtain a weapon like this.