CT Politics

Connecticut Politics

Master of suspense: signs point toward Boughton run for gov

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Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, left, and Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton wave to the crowd while walking in the Danbury Memorial Day parade on Main Street in Danbury on Monday, May 27, 2013.

Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, left, and Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton wave to the crowd while walking in the Danbury Memorial Day parade on Main Street in Danbury on Monday, May 27, 2013.

In what’s being billed as a rally — and last time we checked that’s often a synonym for campaign kickoff — Danbury Mayor and presumptive gubernatorial candidate Mark Boughton has invited his supporters to an “appreciation” event next Wednesday night at the Crown Plaza hotel in his city.

“This event is an opportunity for me to personally thank you for your generous support as I’ve explored a run for governor the past several months,” Boughton wrote in a email invitation obtained on Friday by Hearst Connecticut Newspapers.

Boughton formed an exploratory committee, the first step toward running for governor, in August to gauge support within the GOP and the electorate as a whole.

In an interview Thursday with Hearst, the seven-term incumbent mayor said he would make a final decision on whether to enter the race within the next two weeks.

Judgement Day, it seems, might already be here.

 

Categories: General
Neil Vigdor

2 Responses

  1. Fords says:

    The big winner hear could be John McKinney.

    The fact Tim Herbst is even considered a rising star in the GOP should be cause for the party to panic. He’s a small, insignificant town career politician (who ever though small towns could have career politicians”) who has accomplished exactly zero in his life, aside from navigating the complex waters of suburban politics.

    The party should be lead by persons of substance, not guys who couldn’t even pass the bar.

  2. Weekender says:

    The big loser here is Foley.

    Boughton knows Foley, having spent considerable time with him last cycle, and he’s made no secret of he fact that he was underwhelmed. Boughton is also a more credibly “populist” alternative to Foley.

    With the McKinney / Greenburg alliance, the battle for Litchfield and northern Fairfield County could end up a draw. That means the eastern half (the second congressional district) of the state will be even more important in determining the outcome. That’s also not good for Foley.

    With Lauretti looking to get in, the fight for the Naugatuck River valley from Torrington to Long Island Sound could be interesting. Boughton probably plays better in those declining industrial towns than McKinney. As with the second district, Foley again will be fighting for air.

    Current prognosis then, with the entrance of Lauretti and especially Boughton, the only thing keeping Foley in the mix is his personal fortune – a considerable factor – and his tenuous grip on reality. McKinney still has the advantage of being able to get into the news by virtue of being Senate Minority Leader, and he’s got a network of colleagues sprinkled across the state who will continue to support him – other than McLaughlin of course.

    Meanwhile, the fight amongst the GOP for who gets to run against Treasurer Denise Nappier will commence in earnest within the month. Boucher got out there early, but Tim Herbst is recognized as a rising star in a party that doesn’t have many, and that may work to his advantage as he courts delegates. That’s a nomination that probably sticks with the endorsed candidate.

    What everyone is wondering but nobody is saying is – what statewide office is Senator Rob Kane running for?