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Narrow escape for Bridgeport; most power to be restored today

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By Ken Dixon

Surging tides from Hurricane Sandy came “within inches” of flooding sensitive equipment in two downtown Bridgeport substations late Monday, but because they had been shut down, United Illuminating Co. now plans to restore power to much of the city today.

“The assets we went to great lengths to protect, particularly the substations that could have been flooded, due to extraordinary efforts, were not flooded,” Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said in his morning briefing. “So that’s the good news.”

Once UI workers check a system of three underground vaults, power could begin to be flow to downtown customers and parts of surrounding towns.

“There’s no doubt that turning that system off, putting all of our efforts into making sure that the substations were not impacted adversely, will allow us to restore energy much more rapidly than we would have otherwise been in position to do,” Malloy said.

Tony Marone, senior vice president for UI, told reporters in the State Armory this morning at about 9 o’clock that the decision to shut down the substations on Pequonnock Street, near the power plant and on two on Congress Street, was a good one.

“The water, at least in Bridgeport, as I was told, was within a few inches of reaching those critical components,” Marone said, adding that the two Congress Street substations were already in the process of powering up.

“It really was a combination of a very heroic effort, I believe,” he said. “Because of that we averted what could have been potentially either a catastrophic event, or certainly the potential for outages that could extend into weeks.”

Before power could be re-energized, three dozen underground vaults were being examined.

“It’s our expectation that if we have no damage identified that it will be in the daylight hours today that we’d be able to be bringing that substation back on line and repowering significant portions that were affected specifically because of that outage,” Marone said. “If the damage that we think we avoided is in fact the case we’ll start to see today large chunks of customers being repowered.”

At the storm’s peak, about 187,000 UI customers were without power and 28,000 have had electricity restored. The company has about 200 assessors in the field.

William Quinlan, senior vice president for Connecticut Light and Power, said the company had 11 high-voltage transmission lines out of service. The largest outages were in southwestern and southeastern Connecticut. He said that critical substations in Stamford and Branford were not affected by the high tides.

Peak outages occurred overnight, when about 500,000 customers went dark. About 135,000 CL&P customers had been restored since noon on Monday, Quinlan said.

“At this point we are dispatching hundreds of patrollers, as we speak, out into the field to assess damage, identify outage locations, so we can begin to prepare our restoration plans,” Quinlan said.

Quinlan declined to estimate when power will be fully restored. He said that 400 company line workers were joined by 1,080 out-of-state crews and 600-plus tree workers, plus 500 electricians working to fix individual lines on house so when lines are re-energized, power will come back up.

Malloy planned to spend most of the day traveling with Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman, assessing damage along the shoreline and accounting for missing people.

“We took a big hit over the past few days and I want to thank the people of Connecticut, for hanging in there,” he said. “Now it’s our job to get people’s lives back to normal as quickly as possible.”

Malloy defended his highway travel ban, which he credited for saving lives before he lifted it around 8 a.m. today.

He expected the mid-day tide today to be about a foot and a half less than Monday’s. He said that communications among cities, towns and utilities seem to be satisfactory and that enhanced tree-trimming programs over the last year seem to have helped.

“We did a lot better this time around,” he said. “We’ve taken some heat over tree trimming, I understand that, in the past. If you look at the numbers at the height of this storm, which actually had higher wind…it leads me to believe that some good has been accomplished.”

The governor said he expects President Obama to soon declare the state a disaster area, after Federal Emergency Management Agency officials report to his office. “There is no doubt that that is going to happen at this point,” he said. “We clearly have thousands of units of housing that have been impacted by this storm.”

The governor said that state transit officials have been in communication with New York State and city officials who are confronted with massive “extraordinary” storm-related outages.

“Metro-North on our end of the line will be doing reconnaissance

So that we’ll have an understanding, most likely later today, as to the ability of our portion of the system to transport people in and out of Grand Central, which is the primary depository of our residents,” Malloy said.

Bus service will be restored “as we can,” Malloy said, with Hartford buses scheduled to resume by around noon. He expects full service across the state by Wednesday.

Over-loaded sewage treatment plants, including Bridgeport and Ledyard, had “for a period of time” direct discharge into the Sound. “Suffice to say, for the immediate time being, nobody should eat the clams or oysters.”

William Quinlan, senior vice president for Connecticut Light and Power, said the company had 11 high-voltage transmission lines out of service. The largest outages were in southwestern and southeastern Connecticut. He said that critical substations in Stamford and Branford were not affected by the high tides.

Peak outages occurred overnight, when about 500,000 customers went dark. About 135,000 CL&P customers had been restored since noon on Monday, Quinlan said.

“At this point we are dispatching hundreds of patrollers, as we speak, out into the field to assess damage, identify outage locations, so we can begin to prepare our restoration plans,” Quinlan said.

Quinlan declined to estimate when power will be fully restored. He said that 400 company line workers were joined by 1,080 out-of-state crews and 600-plus tree workers, plus 500 electricians working to fix individual lines on house so when lines are re-energized, power will come back up.

kdixon@ctpost.com; 860-549-4670; twitter.com/KenDixonCT; facebook.com/kendixonct.hearst; blog.ctnews.com/dixon

By Ken Dixon

Surging tides from Hurricane Sandy came “within inches” of flooding sensitive equipment in two downtown Bridgeport substations late Monday, but because they had been shut down, United Illuminating Co. now plans to restore power to much of the city today.

“The assets we went to great lengths to protect, particularly the substations that could have been flooded, due to extraordinary efforts, were not flooded,” Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said in his morning briefing. “So that’s the good news.”

Once UI workers check a system of three underground vaults, power could begin to be flow to downtown customers and parts of surrounding towns.

“There’s no doubt that turning that system off, putting all of our efforts into making sure that the substations were not impacted adversely, will allow us to restore energy much more rapidly than we would have otherwise been in position to do,” Malloy said.

Tony Marone, senior vice president for UI, told reporters in the State Armory this morning at about 9 o’clock that the decision to shut down the substations on Pequonnock Street, near the power plant and on two on Congress Street, was a good one.

“The water, at least in Bridgeport, as I was told, was within a few inches of reaching those critical components,” Marone said, adding that the two Congress Street substations were already in the process of powering up.

“It really was a combination of a very heroic effort, I believe,” he said. “Because of that we averted what could have been potentially either a catastrophic event, or certainly the potential for outages that could extend into weeks.”

Before power could be re-energized, three dozen underground vaults were being examined.

“It’s our expectation that if we have no damage identified that it will be in the daylight hours today that we’d be able to be bringing that substation back on line and repowering significant portions that were affected specifically because of that outage,” Marone said. “If the damage that we think we avoided is in fact the case we’ll start to see today large chunks of customers being repowered.”

At the storm’s peak, about 187,000 UI customers were without power and 28,000 have had electricity restored. The company has about 200 assessors in the field.

Malloy planned to spend most of the day traveling with Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman, assessing damage along the shoreline and accounting for missing people.

“We took a big hit over the past few days and I want to thank the people of Connecticut, for hanging in there,” he said. “Now it’s our job to get people’s lives back to normal as quickly as possible.”

Malloy defended his highway travel ban, which he credited for saving lives before he lifted it around 8 a.m. today.

He expected the mid-day tide today to be about a foot and a half less than Monday’s. He said that communications among cities, towns and utilities seem to be satisfactory and that enhanced tree-trimming programs over the last year seem to have helped.

“We did a lot better this time around,” he said. “We’ve taken some heat over tree trimming, I understand that, in the past. If you look at the numbers at the height of this storm, which actually had higher wind…it leads me to believe that some good has been accomplished.”

The governor said he expects President Obama to soon declare the state a disaster area, after Federal Emergency Management Agency officials report to his office. “There is no doubt that that is going to happen at this point,” he said. “We clearly have thousands of units of housing that have been impacted by this storm.”

The governor said that state transit officials have been in communication with New York State and city officials who are confronted with massive “extraordinary” storm-related outages.

“Metro-North on our end of the line will be doing reconnaissance

So that we’ll have an understanding, most likely later today, as to the ability of our portion of the system to transport people in and out of Grand Central, which is the primary depository of our residents,” Malloy said.

Bus service will be restored “as we can,” Malloy said, with Hartford buses scheduled to resume by around noon. He expects full service across the state by Wednesday.

Over-loaded sewage treatment plants, including Bridgeport and Ledyard, had “for a period of time” direct discharge into the Sound. “Suffice to say, for the immediate time being, nobody should eat the clams or oysters.”

William Quinlan, senior vice president for Connecticut Light and Power, said the company had 11 high-voltage transmission lines out of service. The largest outages were in southwestern and southeastern Connecticut. He said that critical substations in Stamford and Branford were not affected by the high tides.

Peak outages occurred overnight, when about 500,000 customers went dark. About 135,000 CL&P customers had been restored since noon on Monday, Quinlan said.

“At this point we are dispatching hundreds of patrollers, as we speak, out into the field to assess damage, identify outage locations, so we can begin to prepare our restoration plans,” Quinlan said.

Quinlan declined to estimate when power will be fully restored. He said that 400 company line workers were joined by 1,080 out-of-state crews and 600-plus tree workers, plus 500 electricians working to fix individual lines on house so when lines are re-energized, power will come back up.

kdixon@ctpost.com; 860-549-4670; twitter.com/KenDixonCT; facebook.com/kendixonct.hearst; blog.ctnews.com/dixon

By Ken Dixon

Surging tides from Hurricane Sandy came “within inches” of flooding sensitive equipment in two downtown Bridgeport substations late Monday, but because they had been shut down, United Illuminating Co. now plans to restore power to much of the city today.

“The assets we went to great lengths to protect, particularly the substations that could have been flooded, due to extraordinary efforts, were not flooded,” Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said in his morning briefing. “So that’s the good news.”

Once UI workers check a system of three underground vaults, power could begin to be flow to downtown customers and parts of surrounding towns.

“There’s no doubt that turning that system off, putting all of our efforts into making sure that the substations were not impacted adversely, will allow us to restore energy much more rapidly than we would have otherwise been in position to do,” Malloy said.

Tony Marone, senior vice president for UI, told reporters in the State Armory this morning at about 9 o’clock that the decision to shut down the substations on Pequonnock Street, near the power plant and on two on Congress Street, was a good one.

“The water, at least in Bridgeport, as I was told, was within a few inches of reaching those critical components,” Marone said, adding that the two Congress Street substations were already in the process of powering up.

“It really was a combination of a very heroic effort, I believe,” he said. “Because of that we averted what could have been potentially either a catastrophic event, or certainly the potential for outages that could extend into weeks.”

Before power could be re-energized, three dozen underground vaults were being examined.

“It’s our expectation that if we have no damage identified that it will be in the daylight hours today that we’d be able to be bringing that substation back on line and repowering significant portions that were affected specifically because of that outage,” Marone said. “If the damage that we think we avoided is in fact the case we’ll start to see today large chunks of customers being repowered.”

At the storm’s peak, about 187,000 UI customers were without power and 28,000 have had electricity restored. The company has about 200 assessors in the field.

Malloy planned to spend most of the day traveling with Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman, assessing damage along the shoreline and accounting for missing people.

“We took a big hit over the past few days and I want to thank the people of Connecticut, for hanging in there,” he said. “Now it’s our job to get people’s lives back to normal as quickly as possible.”

Malloy defended his highway travel ban, which he credited for saving lives before he lifted it around 8 a.m. today.

He expected the mid-day tide today to be about a foot and a half less than Monday’s. He said that communications among cities, towns and utilities seem to be satisfactory and that enhanced tree-trimming programs over the last year seem to have helped.

“We did a lot better this time around,” he said. “We’ve taken some heat over tree trimming, I understand that, in the past. If you look at the numbers at the height of this storm, which actually had higher wind…it leads me to believe that some good has been accomplished.”

The governor said he expects President Obama to soon declare the state a disaster area, after Federal Emergency Management Agency officials report to his office. “There is no doubt that that is going to happen at this point,” he said. “We clearly have thousands of units of housing that have been impacted by this storm.”

The governor said that state transit officials have been in communication with New York State and city officials who are confronted with massive “extraordinary” storm-related outages.

“Metro-North on our end of the line will be doing reconnaissance

So that we’ll have an understanding, most likely later today, as to the ability of our portion of the system to transport people in and out of Grand Central, which is the primary depository of our residents,” Malloy said.

Bus service will be restored “as we can,” Malloy said, with Hartford buses scheduled to resume by around noon. He expects full service across the state by Wednesday.

Over-loaded sewage treatment plants, including Bridgeport and Ledyard, had “for a period of time” direct discharge into the Sound. “Suffice to say, for the immediate time being, nobody should eat the clams or oysters.”

William Quinlan, senior vice president for Connecticut Light and Power, said the company had 11 high-voltage transmission lines out of service. The largest outages were in southwestern and southeastern Connecticut. He said that critical substations in Stamford and Branford were not affected by the high tides.

Peak outages occurred overnight, when about 500,000 customers went dark. About 135,000 CL&P customers had been restored since noon on Monday, Quinlan said.

“At this point we are dispatching hundreds of patrollers, as we speak, out into the field to assess damage, identify outage locations, so we can begin to prepare our restoration plans,” Quinlan said.

Quinlan declined to estimate when power will be fully restored. He said that 400 company line workers were joined by 1,080 out-of-state crews and 600-plus tree workers, plus 500 electricians working to fix individual lines on house so when lines are r

By Ken Dixon

Surging tides from Hurricane Sandy came “within inches” of flooding sensitive equipment in two downtown Bridgeport substations late Monday, but because they had been shut down, United Illuminating Co. now plans to restore power to much of the city today.

“The assets we went to great lengths to protect, particularly the substations that could have been flooded, due to extraordinary efforts, were not flooded,” Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said in his morning briefing. “So that’s the good news.”

Once UI workers check a system of three underground vaults, power could begin to be flow to downtown customers and parts of surrounding towns.

“There’s no doubt that turning that system off, putting all of our efforts into making sure that the substations were not impacted adversely, will allow us to restore energy much more rapidly than we would have otherwise been in position to do,” Malloy said.

Tony Marone, senior vice president for UI, told reporters in the State Armory this morning at about 9 o’clock that the decision to shut down the substations on Pequonnock Street, near the power plant and on two on Congress Street, was a good one.

“The water, at least in Bridgeport, as I was told, was within a few inches of reaching those critical components,” Marone said, adding that the two Congress Street substations were already in the process of powering up.

“It really was a combination of a very heroic effort, I believe,” he said. “Because of that we averted what could have been potentially either a catastrophic event, or certainly the potential for outages that could extend into weeks.”

Before power could be re-energized, three dozen underground vaults were being examined.

“It’s our expectation that if we have no damage identified that it will be in the daylight hours today that we’d be able to be bringing that substation back on line and repowering significant portions that were affected specifically because of that outage,” Marone said. “If the damage that we think we avoided is in fact the case we’ll start to see today large chunks of customers being repowered.”

At the storm’s peak, about 187,000 UI customers were without power and 28,000 have had electricity restored. The company has about 200 assessors in the field.

Malloy planned to spend most of the day traveling with Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman, assessing damage along the shoreline and accounting for missing people.

“We took a big hit over the past few days and I want to thank the people of Connecticut, for hanging in there,” he said. “Now it’s our job to get people’s lives back to normal as quickly as possible.”

Malloy defended his highway travel ban, which he credited for saving lives before he lifted it around 8 a.m. today.

He expected the mid-day tide today to be about a foot and a half less than Monday’s. He said that communications among cities, towns and utilities seem to be satisfactory and that enhanced tree-trimming programs over the last year seem to have helped.

“We did a lot better this time around,” he said. “We’ve taken some heat over tree trimming, I understand that, in the past. If you look at the numbers at the height of this storm, which actually had higher wind…it leads me to believe that some good has been accomplished.”

The governor said he expects President Obama to soon declare the state a disaster area, after Federal Emergency Management Agency officials report to his office. “There is no doubt that that is going to happen at this point,” he said. “We clearly have thousands of units of housing that have been impacted by this storm.”

The governor said that state transit officials have been in communication with New York State and city officials who are confronted with massive “extraordinary” storm-related outages.

“Metro-North on our end of the line will be doing reconnaissance

So that we’ll have an understanding, most likely later today, as to the ability of our portion of the system to transport people in and out of Grand Central, which is the primary depository of our residents,” Malloy said.

Bus service will be restored “as we can,” Malloy said, with Hartford buses scheduled to resume by around noon. He expects full service across the state by Wednesday.

Over-loaded sewage treatment plants, including Bridgeport and Ledyard, had “for a period of time” direct discharge into the Sound. “Suffice to say, for the immediate time being, nobody should eat the clams or oysters.”

William Quinlan, senior vice president for Connecticut Light and Power, said the company had 11 high-voltage transmission lines out of service. The largest outages were in southwestern and southeastern Connecticut. He said that critical substations in Stamford and Branford were not affected by the high tides.

Peak outages occurred overnight, when about 500,000 customers went dark. About 135,000 CL&P customers had been restored since noon on Monday, Quinlan said.

“At this point we are dispatching hundreds of patrollers, as we speak, out into the field to assess damage, identify outage locations, so we can begin to prepare our restoration plans,” Quinlan said.

Quinlan declined to estimate when power will be fully restored. He said that 400 company line workers were joined by 1,080 out-of-state crews and 600-plus tree workers, plus 500 electricians working to fix individual lines on house so when lines are re-energized, power will come back up.

kdixon@ctpost.com; 860-549-4670; twitter.com/KenDixonCT; facebook.com/kendixonct.hearst; blog.ctnews.com/dixon

e-energized, power will come back up.

kdixon@ctpost.com; 860-549-4670; twitter.com/KenDixonCT; facebook.com/kendixonct.hearst; blog.ctnews.com/dixon

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Jim Shay

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