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Connecticut’s breast cancer rate is highest in the nation

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Breast cancer survivors and supporters kick off Stamford Hospital's annual "Paint the Town Pink" campaign by donning pink and lining the sidewalk along Mill River Park in Stamford, Conn., October 5, 2013. The campaign, in its ninth year, is aimed at raising awareness and stressing the importance of early detection.

Breast cancer survivors and supporters kick off Stamford Hospital’s annual “Paint the Town Pink” campaign by donning pink and lining the sidewalk along Mill River Park in Stamford, Conn., October 5, 2013. The campaign, in its ninth year, is aimed at raising awareness and stressing the importance of early detection.

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month — a time when NFL players lace up their shoes in pink and men and women run and walk 5Ks from sea to shining sea in the name of raising awareness of the second-deadliest cancer for U.S. women. And here in Connecticut, it may be even more important to do so than in other states around the country.

According to data from the American Cancer Society, the Nutmeg State has the highest rate of breast cancer in women of all states in the nation:

There is a bright side for Connecticut women: The death rate here in the Nutmeg State for women diagnosed with breast cancer is much lower than many other areas of the country. At 22.5 women per 100,000, Connecticut’s rate is slightly below the national average of 23. women, and falls into the bottom half of all states.

Of course, breast cancer affects men, too. The American cancer Society reports that there will be an estimated 232,340 new cases of breast cancer diagnosed in 2013, along with 2,240 diagnosed in men. The organization’s data also projects 39,620 women across the country will die from the disease this year, as will 410 men.

But here in Connecticut the most common for of cancer for men is prostate cancer, with 165.2 men per 100,000 residents, according to the American Cancer Society.

Looking for events to spread awareness and raise funds for the disease? ACS has a list of Connecticut programs here.

Categories: General
Maggie Gordon

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