Weather

Weather updates for Fairfield County Connecticut

Possibly historic blizzard to strike northeast Friday evening

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The northeastern United States is going to get hit again by severe weather.

The National Weather Service has just posted blizzard warnings for the upper east coast from New York City to Boston to Maine.

There are several reasons to be concerned about this storm but the principal one is this: A major snowstorm is forecast to hit the most densely populated corridor of the United States.

Snow accumulations in excess of two feet are possible — totals that are nearly on par with the “Snowmageddon” event that crippled the nation’s capital city for the better part of a week in 2010.

Here’s a look at total snowfall accumulations forecast for Friday and Saturday by the European forecast model:

Total snowfall accumulations from this event, 12z model run of ECMWF model. (Weather Bell)

From this image, which you can click to enlarge, we can see in excess of two feet of snow is possible for much of Connecticut and parts of Massachusetts.

What is perhaps more troubling is the potential for extreme snowfall rates on Friday evening. The image below shows the three-hour snowfall rate for the period ending at 10 p.m. Friday.

Three hour snowfall rates. (Weather Bell)

For parts of southern Connecticut we can see that a foot of snow is possible during a three-hour period for areas of southern Connecticut.

That is the kind of weather in which it is extremely hazardous to be out and about. In addition to the heavy snow, north-northeast winds could gust up to 60 mph, says the National Weather Service.

Storm conditions should arrive by midday Friday, but the worst of the event should occur between sunset Friday and sunrise on Saturday morning. Any last minute preparations should be made now.

Categories: General
Laura Weisman

One Response

  1. Adam Futterman says:

    This storm is similar/more close to the Feb 1978 Blizzard on account of the location of the “phasing” of the energy and the slow movement of the phases system offshore of Cape Cod, whereas the “snowmaggedon” in 2010 was farther to the south. Either way, snow totals will be monumental and historic