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Weather updates for Fairfield County Connecticut

Old Farmer’s Almanac snow forecast for CT

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esidents on Bel Air Lane dig out after a overnight blizzard dumped over two feet of snow in Fairfield, Conn. on Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013.

esidents on Bel Air Lane dig out after a overnight blizzard dumped over two feet of snow in Fairfield, Conn. on Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013.

First, let’s get things on the record.

I love snow. Always have. I love to shovel it and play in it. Downhill skiing, snowshoeing, walking in it or just watching snowflakes fall.

Heaven sent.

Yeah, yeah, I know many people in southern Connecticut HATE snow. They count down the days until winter ends, hate to drive in snow and often are panicked by the doomsday forecasts from TV weather people.

That said, the annual winter forecast by the Old’s Farmer’s Almanac is out. And, I’m happy to say their forecasters are calling for a colder-than-normal winter for two-thirds of the country and heavy snowfall in New England.

Yes, I’m excited, but I’ve been burned before by optimistic snowy forecasts.

The latest edition of the Old’s Farmer’s Almanac hit the newsstands on Monday. It gained a considerable buzz when its predicted that a winter storm will hit the Northeast around the time the Super Bowl is played at MetLife Stadium in the Meadowlands on February 2. Wait a minute, isn’t that Groundhog Day too?

The Almanac claims it’s accurate 80 percent of the time. We’ll see

For skiers and snowboarders heading to play in Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine this winter, the Almanac says:

“Winter will be milder than normal across the north but colder in the south, with precipitation and snowfall both slightly above normal. The coldest periods will be in early and mid-December, late January, and late February. The snowiest periods will be in early November, early to mid-December, late December, and early February.”

So where does Connecticut stand with the winter forecast?

“Winter will be colder and drier than normal, although snowfall will be above normal in most of the region. The coldest periods will be in early and mid-December and in early to mid-February. The snowiest periods will be in early and mid-December, and in early and mid-February.”

Here is the link for the Old Almanac’s 2014 Long-Range Weather Forecast for Connecticut.

If you want to know exactly when it’s going to snow, you have to buy the Old Farmer’s Almanac. You can buy a cheaper digital one for $4.95 here.

They’re not going to give away everything for free.

There’s a reason why it’s been around for 197 years.

In the meantime, get in a wintery mindset with these reader photos from our last storm:

 

Categories: General
Jim Shay

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