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Weather updates for Fairfield County Connecticut

Almanac: A cold, snowy winter forecast

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 Neil Dougherty, left, and Chris Kuba, both of Milford, clear accumulated snow from the roof of Cody White funeral home on Broad Street on The Green in Milford, Conn on Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Photo by Brian A. Pounds

Neil Dougherty, left, and Chris Kuba, both of Milford, clear accumulated snow from the roof of Cody White funeral home on Broad Street on The Green in Milford, Conn on Tuesday, February 18, 2014. Photo by Brian A. Pounds

Colder than average and and above average snowfall.

That’s the forecast from the Old Farmer’s Almanac that was published this week.

“Winter will be colder and slightly wetter than normal, with above-normal snowfall,” the 233-year-old  almanac forecasts. “The coldest periods will be in late December and early and mid-January. The snowiest periods will be in mid- and late December, mid-January, and early to mid-February.”

Yes, it’s still very early to start singing “White Christmas.” And it’s exactly four months before winter officially begins.

Most of southwest Connecticut falls in the Old Farmer’s Almanac Atlantic Corridor Zone. That puts us in the zone for getting more snow; northern areas like Vermont and New Hampshire could see average, or below average snowfalls, the almanac forecasts. It also predicts the eastern two-thirds of the country will be “super cold.”

Here’s the almanac’s temperature forecast:

tempThe almanac, which has about an 80 percent success rate in its forecasts, employs modern technology but still uses the “secret formula” that founder Robert Thomas devised in 1792. By combining the study of sunspots, prevailing weather patterns and basic meteorology, the almanac’s weather staff comes up with a long-range forecast. The temperature deviations are based on 30-year averages compiled by government forecasters.

For more detailed forecasts and other features, you can purchase the almanac HERE.

Last year, the almanac forecast above average snowfall. And they were right.

Bridgeport received 56.2 inches of snow; the average snowfall is 27.60 inches. That was the 13th snowiest winter on record.

On average, Connecticut averages about 44 inches of snow a season with lesser amounts along the shore.

Last winter, Fairfield County was in the deep snow zone with some areas like New Canaan, receiving more than 70 inches!

WXEdge.com has a great map showing how much fell across the state:

snowy1

Here’s a recap of last winter’s “snow events.”

2013

2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: General
Jim Shay

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