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Latest Health Research


Diet

 Difference between “BEST If Used By” label and “USE By” label

Misunderstanding food date labeling is common and educational communications are needed to improve consumer understanding, according to a new study in the *Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior*, published by Elsevier. Does it mean …
Alcohol in moderation may help the heart by calming stress signals in the brain

Moderate alcohol intake–defined as no more than one alcoholic drink for women and two for men per day–has been associated with a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease when compared with individuals who abstain from drinking or partake in excessive drinking, according to a new study being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session. It’s …

Nutrients such as taurine, omega 3, calcium and vitamin D help to protect against the disease Research News The health benefits of sardines and oily fish are widely known: their high levels of unsaturated fats help to regulate cholesterol levels and prevent the onset of cardiovascular diseases. However, the benefits don’t end there. A study led by Diana Diaz Rizzolo, lecturer and researcher of the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya’s (UOC) Faculty of Health Sciences and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS), has discovered that the regular consumption of sa…
One cup of leafy green vegetables a day lowers risk of heart disease

New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found that by eating just one cup of nitrate-rich vegetables each day people can significantly reduce their risk of heart disease. The study investigated whether people who regularly ate higher quantities of nitrate-rich vegetables, such as leafy greens and beetroot, had lower blood pressure, and it also examined whether these same people were less likely to be diagnosed with heart disease many years later. Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death globally, taking around 17.9 million lives each year. Researchers exam…

Eating a Mediterranean diet that is rich in fish, vegetables and olive oil may protect your brain from protein build up and shrinkage that can lead to Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study. The research is published in the May 5, 2021, online issue of *Neurology*®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study looked at abnormal proteins called amyloid and tau. Amyloid is a protein that forms into plaques, while tau is a protein that forms into tangles. Both are found in the brains of people with Alzheim…
Tree nuts may play a role in both weight loss and weight maintenance

n a randomized, controlled study* published online in the journal, *Nutrients*, researchers found that including mixed tree nuts in a weight management program resulted in significant weight loss and improved satiety. Researchers at UCLA compared 95 overweight/obese men and women (BMI 27.0-35.0 kg/m2) ages 30-68 years who consumed either 1.5 ounces of mixed tree nuts or a pretzel snack. Both snacks provided the same number of calories, as part of a hypocaloric weight loss diet (500 calories less than resting metabolic rate) over 12 weeks. This was followed by an isocaloric weight…



Obesity, high-salt diet pose higher cardiovascular risks in females

Obesity and a high-salt diet are both bad for our hearts but they are bigger, seemingly synergistic risks for females, scientists report. “We see younger and younger women having cardiovascular disease and the question is: What is the cause?” says Dr. Eric Belin de Chantemele, physiologist in the Vascular Biology Center and Department of Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. “We think the fact that females are more salt sensitive and more sensitive to obesity are among the reasons they have lost the natural protection youth and estrogen are thought to …

Eating too much salt can severely disrupt the energy balance in immune cells

For many of us, adding salt to a meal is a perfectly normal thing to do. We don’t really think about it. But actually, we should. As well as raising our blood pressure, too much salt can severely disrupt the energy balance in immune cells and stop them from working properly. Back in 2015, the research group led by Professor Dominik Müller of the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) and the Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC) found that elevated sodium concentrations in the blood affect both the activation and the function of p…

People with a high Omega-3 index less likely to die prematurely

Research News A new research paper examining the relationship between the Omega-3 Index and risk for death from any and all causes has been published in *Nature Communications*. It showed that those people with higher omega-3 EPA and DHA blood levels (i.e., Omega-3 Index) lived longer than those with lower levels. In other words, those people who died with relatively low omega-3 levels died prematurely, i.e., all else being equal, they might have lived longer had their levels been higher. Numerous studies have investigated the link between omega-3s and diseases affecting the he…

Processed diets might promote chronic infections that can lead to disorders such as diabetes

Processed diets, which are low in fiber, may initially reduce the incidence of foodborne infectious diseases such as E. coli infections, but might also increase the incidence of diseases characterized by low-grade chronic infection and inflammation such as diabetes, according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. This study used mice to investigate how changing from a grain-based diet to a highly processed, high-fat Western style diet impacts infection with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, which resembles Escherichia coli (E. coli…

Medicine
Have high blood pressure? You may want to check your meds

Many people with high blood pressure are taking another medication that could raise it AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Research News SHARE PRINT E-MAIL Nearly 1 in 5 adults with high blood pressure, a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke, also take a medicine that could be elevating their blood pressure, according to new research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session. The results underscore the need for patients to routinely review all of the medications they take with their care team, including those available over the..


Supplements

Multivitamins, omega-3, probiotics, vitamin D may lessen risk of positive COVID-19 test

Taking multivitamins, omega-3, probiotics or vitamin D supplements may lessen the risk of testing positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19 infection — at least among women — indicates a large population study, published online in the journal *BMJ Nutrition Prevention & Health*. But taking any of vitamin C, zinc, or garlic supplements wasn’t associated with a lower risk of testing positive for the virus, the findings show. There has been plenty of celebrity endorsement of the use of dietary supplements to both ward off and treat COVID-19 infection since the st..

Task Force Issues Draft Recommendation Statement on Vitamin, Mineral, and Multivitamin Supplements to Prevent Heart Disease and Cancer

*Task Force recommends against vitamin E and beta-carotene; more research needed to make a recommendation for most vitamins and minerals * The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) today posted a draft recommendation statement on the use of vitamin, mineral, and multivitamin supplements to prevent heart disease and cancer. The current evidence is insufficient to determine the benefits and harms of taking most vitamin, mineral, and multivitamin supplements to prevent heart disease and cancer. These are I statements. However, the Task Force did find evidence on vitamin …


Consuming prebiotic supplements once a day has a positive impact on anxiety levels

In a paper published in the journal *Scientific Reports*, researchers from Surrey investigated whether the daily consumption of a prebiotic food supplement could improve overall wellbeing in a group of 18 to 25 year-olds. The study found that those who received a daily dose of prebiotics improved mental wellbeing by reducing anxiety levels and had better gut health than the control group. Researchers studied a group of 64 healthy female participants with no current or previous clinical diagnoses of anxiety. Participants received either a daily dose of the prebiotic galacto-oligo…

People with a high Omega-3 index less likely to die prematurely

Research News A new research paper examining the relationship between the Omega-3 Index and risk for death from any and all causes has been published in *Nature Communications*. It showed that those people with higher omega-3 EPA and DHA blood levels (i.e., Omega-3 Index) lived longer than those with lower levels. In other words, those people who died with relatively low omega-3 levels died prematurely, i.e., all else being equal, they might have lived longer had their levels been higher. Numerous studies have investigated the link between omega-3s and diseases affecting the he…


Sleep
Too much, too little sleep linked to elevated heart risks in people free from disease

Sleep should be assessed along with other factors that increase heart disease. People who clock six to seven hours of sleep a night had the lowest chance of dying from a heart attack or stroke when compared with those who got less or more sleep, according to a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session. This trend remained true even after the research team accounted for other known conditions or risk factors for heart disease or stroke. The study, according to …

Lack of sleep in middle age may increase dementia risk

At a Glance – People who slept six hours or less per night in their 50s and 60s were more likely to develop dementia later in life. – The findings suggest that inadequate sleep duration could increase dementia risk and emphasize the importance of good sleep habits. [image: Woman in bed with eyes open touching clock on nightstand]The study explored the links between sleep and dementia.tab1962 / iStock / Getty Images Plus Changes in sleep patterns are common in people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. They may wake up often during the night and find it …


Aging
– People who feel younger have a greater sense of well-being, better cognitive functioning, less inflammation, lower risk of hospitalization and even live longer than their older-feeling peers. A study published by the American Psychological Association suggests one potential reason for the link between subjective age and health: Feeling younger could help buffer middle-aged and older adults against the damaging effects o…
Eating a Mediterranean diet that is rich in fish, vegetables and olive oil may protect your brain from protein build up and shrinkage that can lead to Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study. The research is published in the May 5, 2021, online issue of *Neurology*®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study looked at abnormal proteins called amyloid and tau. Amyloid is a protein that forms into plaques, while tau is a protein that forms into tangles. Both are found in the brains of people with Alzheim…
People with familial longevity show better cognitive aging

Research News -If you come from a family where people routinely live well into old age, you will likely have better cognitive function (the ability to clearly think, learn and remember) than peers from families where people die younger. Researchers affiliated with the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) recently broadened that finding in a paper published in *Gerontology*, suggesting that people who belong to long-lived families also show slower cognitive decline over time. The Long Life Family Study has enrolled over 5,000 participants from almost 600 families and has been following …

Whole-genome sequencing of people who live beyond 105 and 110 years reveals unique genetic signatures linked to protective processes

Researchers have found that people who live beyond 105 years tend to have a unique genetic background that makes their bodies more efficient at repairing DNA, according to a study published today in *eLife.* This is the first time that people with ‘extreme longevity’ have had their genomes decoded in such detail, providing clues as to why they live so long and manage to avoid age-related diseases. “Aging is a common risk factor for several chronic diseases and conditions,” explains Paolo Garagnani, Associate Professor at the Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Med…


General Health
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that healthcare providers screen all adults for hypertension

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) today published a final recommendation statement on screening for hypertension in adults. Based on its review of the evidence, the Task Force recommends that healthcare providers screen all adults 18 years or older for hypertension to improve the health of their patients. This is an A recommendation. This final recommendation is consistent with the 2015 final recommendation on this topic. Hypertension is when a person’s blood pressure is consistently elevated in various settings. It is a very common condition, affecting almost …

Primary care practitioners often over-estimate the likelihood of a patient having a medical condition based on reported symptoms and laboratory test results. Such overestimations can lead to overdiagnosis and overtreatment, according to a recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) published in *JAMA Internal Medicine*. “A large…
Health care professionals should consider prescribing medication for patients with slightly elevated blood pressure if levels do not decrease after six months of healthy lifestyle changes, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association. The statement, published today in the Association’s journal Hypertension, fills a gap in guideline recommendations by addressing how to manage untreated, stage 1 high blood pressu…
Breastfeeding linked to higher neurocognitive testing scores

Research News New research finds that children who were breastfed scored higher on neurocognitive tests. Researchers in the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) analyzed thousands of cognitive tests taken by nine and ten-year-olds whose mothers reported they were breastfed, and compared those results to scores of children who were not. “Our findings suggest that any amount of breastfeeding has a positive cognitive impact, even after just a few months.” Daniel Adan Lopez, Ph.D. candidate in the Epidemiology program who is firs…

Men’s loneliness linked to an increased risk of cancer

Research News A recent study by the University of Eastern Finland shows that loneliness among middle-aged men is associated with an increased risk of cancer. According to the researchers, taking account of loneliness and social relationships should thus be an important part of comprehensive health care and disease prevention. The findings were published in Psychiatry Research. “It has been estimated, on the basis of studies carried out in recent years, that loneliness could be as significant a health risk as smoking or overweight. Our findings support the idea that attention sh…

Exercise
Dab on deep heat cream to improve exercise performance

-Deep heat creams widely used by athletes to soothe sore muscles may also boost performance when applied before exercise, according to new research presented virtually this week at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2021. Researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore studied a small group of male volunteers to determine the effects of deep heat cream on exercise endurance. Each volunteer participated in two trials–one where he applied a thin layer of a commercially available deep heat cream to the muscles of his feet,…

Got 10 minutes? That’s all you need for this high-intensity workout

Four-second cycling sprints improve exercise endurance and power High-intensity cycling in very short bursts can lead to performance and health benefits in just 10 minutes a day, according to a new study to be presented virtually this week at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2021. Young adult volunteers participated in high-intensity cycling three times a week for eight weeks. They cycled at maximum effort for four seconds and rested for 15 to 30 seconds before beginning another four-second sprint. Each sprint-rest bout was repeate…

Exercise appears to reduce the long-term risk of bronchiectasis, a potentially serious disease of the airways, according to a study published in the journal *Radiology*. Bronchiectasis is characterized by repeated cycles of inflammation and exacerbations that damage the airways, leaving them enlarged, scarred and less effective at clearing mucus. This creates an environment ripe for infections. Risk increases with age and the presence of underlying conditions like cystic fibrosis. There is no cure. Computed tomography (CT) is…
A simple exercise goal protects against unhealthy weight gain

New research shows that physical activity equivalent to 100 PAI a week can counteract excessive weight gain. High-intensity exercise can help PAI stands for Personal Activity Intelligence and tracks how physically active you are throughout the week. You can measure PAI with just about any device that can measure heart rate. The activity metric has been developed by the Cardiac Exercise Research Group (CERG) at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) under the leadership of NTNU Professor Ulrik Wisløff. “Previously, we found that 100 PAI a week can give us a lon…


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