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Latest Health Research

 Key Takeaways – Alcohol in moderation, good for heart, bad for brains. My blood pressure isn’t bad, but do I need to lower it? I threw away my Omege -3 supplement and got a different one.


Diet

​​​​​​​No link between milk and increased cholesterol according to new study of 2 million people

Regular consumption of milk is not associated with increased levels of cholesterol, according to new research. A study published in the *International Journal of Obesity* looked at three large population studies and found that people who regularly drank high amounts of milk had lower levels of both good and bad cholesterol, although their BMI levels were higher than non-milk drinkers. Further analysis of other large studies also suggests that those who regularly consumed milk had a 14% lower risk of coronary heart disea…
A low-calorie ketogenic diet can help testosterone levels in overweight men

New research reveals that a low-calorie ketogenic diet can help testosterone levels in overweight men, reducing overall levels of obesity A very low-calorie ketogenic diet can help testosterone and sex hormone (SHBG) levels in overweight men, according to a study being presented at the 23rd?European Congress of Endocrinology (e-ECE 2021), on Monday 24 May 2021 at 14:06 CET (http://www.ece2021.org). The study found that after following a recommended low-calorie ketogenic diet for four weeks, body weight, fat mass and body mass index (BMI) significantly decreased and a substantial …

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Public health advocates frequently site Americans’ high-sodium diet as one factor in the nation’s cardiac health. While sodium has been definitively linked to high-blood pressure — a key risk factor for CVD — few rigorously controlled studies make the direct causal link between high sodium intake and cardiovascular damage, heart attack, or s…
No safe level of alcohol consumption for brain health

No safe dose of alcohol for the brain was found. Moderate consumption is associated with more widespread adverse effects on the brain than previously recognised. Individuals who binge drink or with high blood pressure and BMI may be more susceptible. Detrimental effects of drinking appear to be greater than other modifiable factors. Current ‘low risk’ drinking guidelines should be revisited to take account of brain effects.

Vegan and omnivorous diets promote equivalent muscle mass gain


 Protein intake is more important than protein source if the goal is to gain muscle strength and mass. This is the key finding of a study that compared the effects of strength training in volunteers with a vegan or omnivorous diet, both with protein content considered adequate. In the study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of …

Eating a diet rich in fruit and vegetables is associated with less stress,

Research News Eating a diet rich in fruit and vegetables is associated with less stress, according to new research from Edith Cowan University (ECU). The study examined the link between fruit and vegetable intake and stress levels of more than 8,600 Australians aged between 25 and 91 participating in the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) Study from Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute. The findings revealed people who ate at least 470 grams of fruit and vegetables daily had 10 per cent lower stress levels than those who consumed less than 230 grams. The World Hea.

Colorectal cancer diagnoses have increased among people under age 50 in recent years and researchers are seeking reasons why. A new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found a link between drinking sugar-sweetened beverages and an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer in women under age 50. The findings suggest that heavy consumption of sugary drinks during adolescence (ages 13 to 18) and adulthood can increase the disease risk. The study, published online May 6 in the journal *Gut*, provides more suppor…
Pink drinks can help you run faster and further

A new study led by the Centre for Nutraceuticals in the University of Westminster shows that pink drinks can help to make you run faster and further compared to clear drinks. The researchers found that a pink drink can increase exercise performance by 4.4 per cent and can also increase a ‘feel good’ effect which can make exercise seem easier. The study, published in the journal *Frontiers in Nutrition*, is the first investigation to assess the effect of drink colour on exercise performance and provides the potential to open a new avenue of future research in the field of sports d…

Alcohol in moderation may help the heart by calming stress signals in the brain

Findings should spur the search for new therapies that help lower stress and impact the heart without the drawbacks of alcohol AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Research News Moderate alcohol intake–defined as no more than one alcoholic drink for women and two for men per day–has been associated with a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease when compared with individuals who abstain from drinking or partake in excessive drinking, according to a new study being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session. It’s also the first study t…

Organic meat less likely to be contaminated with multidrug-resistant bacteria

 Meat that is certified organic by the U.S. Department of Agriculture is less likely to be contaminated with bacteria that can sicken people, including dangerous, multidrug-resistant organisms, compared to conventionally produced meat, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Heal…

Kefir packs less of a probiotic punch than labels claim

Gut health is having a moment, with sales of fermented foods such as kefir, kombucha, and kimchi steadily on the rise. The benefits of “good bacteria” in fermented foods and supplements go well beyond the gut, moderating immune responses, heart health, weight, and even mood. But do products hold up to the claims on their labels? A new study from the University of Illinois and The Ohio State University examined bacterial content of five brands of kefir, a fermented dairy beverage often likened to drinkable yogurt. The research showed the majority of products overstated bacterial d…

Vegetarians appear to have a healthier biomarker profile than meat-eaters, and this applies to adults of any age and weight, and is also unaffected by smoking and alcohol consumption, according to a new study in over 166,000 UK adults, being presented at this week’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO), held online this year. Biomarkers can have bad and good health effects, promoting or preventing cancer, cardiovascular and age-related diseases, and other chronic conditions, and have been widely u…
General Health
Follow-up data from the landmark SPRINT study of the effect of high blood pressure on cardiovascular disease have confirmed that aggressive blood pressure management — lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 120 mm Hg — dramatically reduces the risk of heart disease, str…
Study finds women with osteoporosis and low bone density are at increased risk of hearing loss

Bisphosphonates, commonly prescribed to reduce bone fracture risks, were not shown to alter likelihood of hearing loss BRIGHAM AND WOMEN’S HOSPITAL Research News – Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition in the United States. Previous studies of people with hearing loss have uncovered higher prevalence of osteoporosis — a disease in which the bones become weak and brittle — and low bone density (LBD). But research on whether these conditions may influence risk of hearing loss over time is scarce. It is also unknown whether hearing loss can be avoided by …

Bottom Line: The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that adults ages 45 to 75 be screened for colorectal cancer, lowering the age for screening that was previously 50 to 75. The USPSTF also recommends that clinicians selectively offer screening to adults 76 to 85 years of age. Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the United States. In 2016, 26% of eligible adults had never been screened and nearly one-third were not up to date with screening in 2018. The USPSTF routinely makes reco…
Women with mildly elevated blood pressure in their early 40s have a two-fold risk of acute coronary syndromes in their 50s compared to their counterparts with normal blood pressure. That’s the finding of a study published on World Hypertension Day in the *European Journal of Preventive Cardiology*, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 “Even if they feel healthy, women should have their blood pressure measured by their primary care physician and repeated at regu…
Dental procedures during pandemic are no riskier than a drink of water

Research News A new study’s findings dispel the misconception that patients and providers are at high risk of catching COVID-19 at the dentist’s office. SARS-CoV-2 spreads mainly through respiratory droplets, and dental procedures are known to produce an abundance of aerosols – leading to fears that flying saliva during a cleaning or a restorative procedure could make the dentist’s chair a high-transmission location. Ohio State University researchers set out to determine whether saliva is the main source of the spray, collecting samples from personnel, equipment and other surfac…

Obesity increases the risk of developing 10 of the most common cancers, regardless of how it is measured , according to a study of more than 400,000 adults in the UK, being presented at The European Congress on Obesity (ECO) held online this year, with central fatness (larger waist and hips) and general obesity (body mass index [BMI] and body fat percentage) associated with similar estimates of cancer risk. The results suggest that BMI is an adequate measure of cancer risk from excess weight, and there is no advantage in using more complicated or expensive measures such as waist c…
Exercise
Data from ~6,000 9- and 10-year-old show positive effects on the developing ‘connectome’ Regular physical activity has positive effects on children’s developing brain circuits, finds a Boston Children’s Hospital …
Different physical activity ‘cocktails’ have similar health benefits

Research News A new study from Columbia University and an international team of researchers identifies multiple ways to achieve the same health benefits from exercise–as long as the exercise “cocktail” includes plenty of light physical activity. “For decades, we’ve been telling people that the way to stay healthy is to get at least 30 minutes of exercise five days a week,” says Keith Diaz, PhD, assistant professor of behavioral medicine and director of the exercise testing laboratory at the Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health at Columbia University Vagelos College of Phy…

Physical inactivity linked to more severe COVID-19 infection and death

Physical inactivity is linked to more severe COVID-19 infection and a heightened risk of dying from the disease, finds a large US study published online in the *British Journal of Sports Medicine.* Patients with COVID-19 who were consistently inactive during the 2 years preceding the pandemic were more likely to be admitted to hospital, to require intensive care, and to die than were patients who had consistently met physical activity guidelines, the findings show. As a risk factor for severe disease, physical inactivity was surpassed only by advanced age and a history of organ t…

Supplements
Higher blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids from prescription fish oil showed no effect on CV events

Research News Patients at high risk for cardiovascular events who had the highest levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in their blood one year after taking daily omega-3 carboxylic acid, a prescription-grade fish oil, had similar rates of major cardiovascular events as people taking a corn oil placebo, according to a secondary analysis of the STRENGTH trial presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 70th Annual Scientific Session. Researchers also found no increase in cardiovascular events among patients with the highest levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) compared to p…

New study finds combination of Omega-3s in popular supplements may blunt heart benefits

Doctors often recommend Omega-3s to help patients lower their cholesterol and improve heart health. Those Omega-3s can come from fatty fish like salmon and mackerel, or supplements that often contain a combination of the acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Now, new research from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City finds that higher EPA blood levels alone lowered the risk of major cardiac events and death in patients, while DHA blunted the cardiovascular benefits of EPA. Higher DHA levels at any level of EPA, worsened health …

‘Insufficient evidence’ to support herbal and dietary supplements for weight loss

The first global review of complementary medicines (herbal and dietary supplements) for weight loss in 16 years–combining 121 randomised placebo-controlled trials including nearly 10,000 adults–suggests that their use cannot be justified based on the current evidence. The findings of two studies, being presented at The European Congress on Obesity (ECO) held online this year, suggest that although some herbal and dietary supplements show statistically greater weight loss than placebo, it is not enough to benefit health, and the authors call for more research into their long-te…


Aging
Music may benefit older adults with cognitive impairment

Research News Active music-making can provide cognitive benefits to older adults with mild cognitive impairment or dementia, according to an analysis of all relevant studies. The analysis, which is published in the *Journal of the American Geriatrics Society*, also found that music may help improve their quality of life and mood. The analysis included nine studies with a total of 495 participants. The authors noted that music-based interventions could potentially provide millions of older adults with critical support for their cognitive, emotional, and social well-being. “We a…

A complex link between body mass index and Alzheimer’s

Study finds combined genetic risk, lower BMI predict disease progression. Though obesity in midlife is linked to an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease, new research suggests that a high body mass index later in life doesn’t necessarily translate to greater chances of developing the brain disease. In the study, researchers compared data from two groups of people who had been diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment – half whose disease progressed to Alzheimer’s in 24 months and half whose condition d…

Meditative practice and spiritual wellbeing may preserve cognitive function in aging


In the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease investigators review research that shows spiritual fitness and meditation mitigate the negative effects of stress and reduce the risk of memory loss, cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer’s disease I It is projected that up to 152 million people worldwide will be living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) b…


Medicine
Cholesterol-lowering statins prescribed less later in day

Research News Furthering efforts to understand why potentially life-saving statins are so under-prescribed among American patients with heart disease, a new study shows that clinicians are more likely to sign a script for them earlier in the day. The new study by researchers in Penn Medicine’s Nudge Unit found that patients with the very first appointments of the day were most likely to have statins prescribed, and the odds progressively fell through the morning and remained low throughout the afternoon. The study was published today in *JAMA Network Open*. In recent years, res…

Antibiotics: Patient Expectations and Doctors’ Prescribing Habits May Contribute to Antimicrobial Resistance

Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections contributes to antibiotic resistance, making some bacterial infections difficult to treat. This often leads to higher medical costs, prolonged hospital stays and increased mortality. Still, many physicians report prescribing antibiotics at their patients’ request. To address patients’ expectations for antibiotic prescribing for URTIs, researchers conducted an experiment in which study participants were assigned brief educational videos to watch on a tablet immediately prior to their appointment. The autho…


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