CDC confirms 3 cases of Enterovirus-D68 at CT Children’s Medical Center

This press release just arrived at our news desk from the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center:

CDC TESTING CONFIRMS ENTEROVIRUS-D68 CASES AT

CONNECTICUT CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER

HARTFORD, Conn. – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms 3 of 6 samples sent by Connecticut Children’s Medical Center for testing were positive for Enterovirus-D68.  The samples were representative of our pediatric population and confirm what our infectious diseases physicians have suspected all along.

“We already knew there was a strong possibility it was here,” said Dr. Nicholas Bennett, medical director of infectious diseases and immunology at Connecticut Children’s. “We sent in samples to help the CDC track the virus and its spread across the nation.”

The confirmations does not change the way we are delivering care or treating patients suspected of having the virus.  We are also not the first hospital to have confirmed cases.

“Because Enterovirus is a virus there is no treatment, except for treatments for the wheezing, the same as you would for any other asthma attack,” said Dr. Bennett. “It seems to be easily treated and kids are generally getting better quickly, in a few days.”

In response to news that the CDC is investigating links between Enterovirus D-68 and paralysis, Dr. Bennett says there have been no cases of paralysis at Connecticut Children’s.

Although it appears Connecticut Enterovirus cases have already peaked- concerned parents can monitor their children for the following symptoms:

• Runny nose, sneezing, coughing

• Skin rash

• Mouth blisters

• Body and muscle aches

• Fever

Symptoms of Enterovirus-D68 typically last a week and children rarely experience any lasting health problems. That being said, care for the virus is usually supportive and similar to that of a common cold. Only a small percentage of patients will require hospitalization for their symptoms, especially if these patients suffer from severe respiratory issues, like asthma.

Brian Koonz